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You are here: Penwith on the Web/Living in Penwith/Sustainable Development and Improvement (Planning and Building Control)/Local Plan
Penwith District Local Plan
Adopted 2004
5 GENERAL DEVELOPMENT GUIDANCE
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INTRODUCTION
POLICY BACKGROUND
POLICIES AND PROPOSALS
Scale and Siting of Development
POLICY GD-1
Design and layout of Development
POLICY GD-2
Landscaping and Planting
POLICY GD-3
Provision of Services and Prevention of Pollution and Flooding
POLICY GD-4
Highway Issues
POLICY GD-5
Advertisements and Signs
POLICY GD-6
Conversion of Non-Residential Buildings
POLICY GD-7
Buildings of Local Significance
POLICY GD-8
Summary of POLICIES and PROPOSALS
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Local Plan Menu
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1 Introduction
2 The Local Plan Area
3 Plan Strategy
4 Objectives
5 General Development Guidance
6 Coast and Countryside
7 Towns and Villages
8 Housing
9 Employment
10 Tourism
11 Recreation
12 Transportation
13 Community Services
14 Environmental Appraisal
15 Monitoring and Review
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Glossary
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5. GENERAL DEVELOPMENT GUIDANCE
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5.1 INTRODUCTION

5.1.1 In order to achieve a consistent and high standard of development throughout the District it is important to specify broad criteria that developments will be expected to meet. The early establishment of these general development principles will clearly identify the expectations of the planning authority to all those involved in the development process, from householders to proposers of major schemes. This section contains general policies which are intended to apply to all developments, although the requirements of each criterion in relation to specific proposals will need to be assessed individually. The consideration of these issues at this point in the Plan will eliminate repetition of criteria in other policies. Where related issues are considered elsewhere in the Plan these are cross referenced.

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5.2 POLICY BACKGROUND

5.2.1 The need to determine a framework for land use planning decisions and to protect the most sensitive environments is identified in the White Paper "This Common Inheritance". The role of the planning system in effectively reconciling pressure for development with the protection of the environment is recognised in Planning Policy Guidance Note 1 "General Policy and Principles" (PPG 1) and in the emerging Planning Policy Statement "Delivering Sustainable Development" (PPS 1). In addition the guidance indicates that development plans should set out the local authority's design expectations but without unnecessary prescription or detail.

5.2.2 With regard to advertisements PPG 19 "Outdoor Advertisement Control" accepts that the appearance of buildings can be adversely affected by poor advertisements. It further indicates that policies giving guidance on the types and locations of advertisements that might be acceptable are appropriate for inclusion in development plans.

5.2.3 The Cornwall Design Guide, published by the County Council, contains advice on the design and layout of residential development and the District Council has published leaflets on such issues as conversions and window and door design. Advice and assistance on all aspects of the layout and design of development is available from the District Council's planning service. Advice is also available from "By Design", the companion guide to PPG 1, and from "Protecting Design Quality in Planning" published by the Commission for Architecture in the Built Environment (CABE).

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5.3 POLICIES AND PROPOSALS

5.3.1 The policies contained in this section relate to the way in which development is carried out and they have a critical role therefore in carrying forward many of the objectives to the Local Plan. Policies focus on ensuring that proposals are well integrated with their surroundings in order to safeguard the character and special values of the District. Other objectives carried forward are the protection of air, water and soil qualities, the promotion of energy efficiency, through the layout and orientation of buildings, and the creation of a safe and secure human environment which includes provision for walking and cycling. The General Development Guidance policies must be considered alongside all other policies of the Plan in assessing proposals for development and are particularly important in minimising the environmental impact of development. The Council proposes to produce its own Design Guide, relating specifically to the District, to provide more detailed supplementary guidance on the implementation of these and other relevant policies of the Plan.

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Scale and Siting of Development

5.3.2 The landscape and character of the District vary considerably from the rugged west to the more gentle countryside of the east. While the open seascapes, areas of moorland and agricultural vistas give an impression of great space, in reality the landscape is small in scale with a limited capacity to absorb development. Policy ENV 12 of the Structure Plan (Policies 1 & 2, 2004) requires that the siting and design of new development should always respect the qualities in the natural and built environment that provide local distinctiveness. Often quite modest development can be seen from a considerable part of the District and the accommodation of more significant proposals, such as large holiday complexes or industrial estates, needs very careful consideration. In addition the integration of development with its surroundings, in both rural and built up areas, is a significant factor in limiting its impact in both the immediate locality and wider landscape. It is essential therefore that, in pursuing a sustainable approach to the landscape and built environment of the District, development proposals are of a scale which is appropriate to the area and located so as to minimise visual impact.

5.3.3 POLICY GD-1:

DEVELOPMENT SHOULD BE INTEGRATED WITH ITS SURROUNDINGS IN TERMS OF SCALE, SITING AND DESIGN AND BE IN KEEPING WITH THE CHARACTER OF THE DISTRICT.

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Design and layout of Development

5.3.4 There are a number of important factors to take into account in the design and layout of proposals if developments are to relate well to their surroundings and provide an efficient, safe and pleasant environment for all users. For residential development the Cornwall Design Guide, published by the County Council, provides comprehensive advice on such issues (para. 8.3.96). The District has a rich and diverse built environment and, while it is not necessary for the design of buildings to be prescriptive, it is important that they respect the traditional character of their locality in terms of style, form, detailing and materials. Structure Plan Policy ENV 12 (Policies 1 & 2, 2004) makes it clear that the design and materials used in new development should respect the qualities which provide local distinctiveness. While the availability of traditional building materials is limited there are often other sources and acceptable alternatives that can be utilised. In many cases recycled materials may also be a practical solution. New development also provides the opportunity to utilise energy efficient designs and incorporate measures to reduce energy consumption. While, in any given period, the proportion of new development which can effectively incorporate such elements may be small compared with the existing stock, it is through a continuing effort over a number of years that improvements will be achieved. New development will be expected to utilise designs and layouts which provide the maximum gains in terms of passive solar energy collection. Circular 5/94 "Planning out Crime" identifies that crime prevention can be a material consideration in dealing with planning applications and the design and construction of groups and individual buildings, layout, mix of uses and location of street furniture can all be used to deter crime. POLICY TV-7 (para. 7.3.21) relates specifically to the use of security measures on shops and commercial premises in Conservation Areas. The Government also launched in 2004 "Safer Places - The Planning System and Crime Prevention" which assists planning officers and the police in designing safer and therefore more sustainable communities.

5.3.5 It is essential that development provides attractive, convenient and safe facilities for pedestrians and cyclists and Policy TRAN 5 (Policy 28, 2004) of the Structure Plan emphasises the need to encourage journeys on foot and bicycle. If reliance on the use of the private car is to be reduced the alternative means of transport must be practical and easy to use with, in the case of cyclists, secure parking facilities at locations which generate a large number of trips such as workplaces, supermarkets and in town centres. The design and layout of development should also maximise opportunities for use of public transport. In the interests of ensuring full accessibility for all sectors of the population development must make provision, both within sites and to surrounding areas, for the movement of those with young children, disabilities or limited mobility.

5.3.6 In many cases sites or buildings which are the subject of development proposals contain features of value to wildlife. These may include meadows, hedgerows, woodlands, trees, watercourses, river corridors, ponds, wetlands and the buildings themselves. In addition many sites contain features which are significant to the amenity of a wider area. The retention of these features can assist in the integration of development and help maintain the diversity and extent of habitats. It should be noted that POLICY CC-9 (para. 6.3.45) seeks to avoid harm to protected species, POLICY CC-10 (para. 6.3.48) relates to protecting the integrity of landscape features and habitats of major importance and POLICY CC-12 (para. 6.3.57) is relevant to development which would result in the loss of features which make a significant contribution to the character of the landscape. The policy framework of the Local Plan can also be used effectively to ensure that development proposals in the Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) are sensitive to, and reflect the special character of, the area. (POLICY CC-3, para. 6.3.13). Additional requirements for the design and layout of residential development are contained in POLICY H-18 (para. 8.3.106).

5.3.7 POLICY GD-2:

THE DESIGN AND LAYOUT OF DEVELOPMENT SHOULD:

(i) RESPECT TRADITIONAL PATTERNS OF DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDING STYLES, FORM AND DETAILING;

(ii) INCORPORATE MATERIALS THAT ARE IN KEEPING WITH THE LOCALITY; AND WHERE APPROPRIATE:

(iii) MAXIMISE PASSIVE SOLAR GAIN AND UTILISE ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDING TYPES;

(iv) PROVIDE A SAFE AND SECURE ENVIRONMENT WHICH REDUCES THE RISK OF CRIME;

(v) MAKE PROVISION FOR WALKING AND CYCLING WHICH IS SAFE, CONVENIENT AND ATTRACTIVE AND INCLUDE SECURE CYCLE PARKING FACILITIES;

(vi) MAKE PROVISION FOR THE NEEDS OF DISABLED PEOPLE, PERSONS WITH RESTRICTED MOBILITY AND THOSE WITH YOUNG CHILDREN IN TERMS OF MOVEMENT TO, FROM AND WITHIN THE SITE;

(vii) RETAIN AND INCORPORATE EXISTING TREES AND OTHER FEATURES WHICH CONTRIBUTE TO THE CHARACTER AND VALUE TO WILDLIFE OF THE SITE OR TO THE AMENITY OF THE SURROUNDING AREA;

(viii) SEEK TO MAXIMISE PUBLIC TRANSPORT OPPORTUNITIES; AND

(ix) ALLOW FOR RECYCLING AND WASTE COLLECTION FACILITIES

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Landscaping and Planting

5.3.8 The incorporation of effective landscaping and screening in development proposals is important in limiting visual impact, providing shelter and adding interest. Policy ENV 12 of the Structure Plan (Policy 2, 2004) identifies the need for landscaping to respect the qualities which provide local distinctiveness. It is essential therefore that landscaping schemes are in keeping with the location of the development in terms of type of species utilised and their suitability in the prevailing conditions. Careful location and design of schemes together with choice of plants which support a variety of species can, in many cases, make a valuable contribution to wildlife habitat. The inclusion of creative conservation measures, such as ponds, within landscaping schemes can be a positive method of encouraging a greater diversity of wildlife within and around development proposals.

5.3.9 POLICY GD-3:

PROPOSALS FOR DEVELOPMENT SHOULD WHERE APPROPRIATE INCORPORATE LANDSCAPING AND PLANTING WHICH REDUCES THEIR IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT AND WHICH REFLECTS THE CHARACTER OF THE SURROUNDINGS AND PROVIDES SCREENING SHELTER AND INTEREST. WHERE PRACTICABLE, SUCH LANDSCAPING AND PLANTING MUST BE CAPABLE OF SUPPORTING A VARIETY OF SPECIES AND INCLUDE PROVISION FOR WILDLIFE AND OTHER CREATIVE CONSERVATION MEASURES.

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Provision of Services and Prevention of Pollution and Flooding

5.3.10 In considering development proposals it is essential to ensure that they can be adequately serviced and do not cause wider environmental problems. In certain parts of the District the provision of adequate water supply and sewage disposal facilities have caused difficulties in the past. The implementation of the Regional Sewerage Scheme and other infrastructure projects has eliminated the majority of these problems, however, it remains important to assess the impact of new developments on the water supply and sewerage disposal networks and sewage disposal facilities. Policy R 1 of the Structure Plan states that development should have regard to the availability of infrastructure facilities and POLICY CS-1 (para. 13.3.3) identifies the need for new and improved community facilities to be related to the existing and proposed distribution of development. Clearly the existence or planned provision of such facilities must be a prerequisite to the granting of planning permission. Where infrastructure is required that would not have been needed but for a development, Policy R 3 of the Structure Plan states that developers should pay for or contribute to the cost of such facilities but this should not be a route for bringing forward developments in inappropriate locations. POLICY CS-7 (para. 13.3.26) relates specifically to the use of septic tanks, cesspools and 'package' sewage treatment plants. Policies ENV 14 and 16 of the Structure Plan state that development should not increase pollution to a significant degree or lead to the significant contamination of land and Policy ENV 15 requires that the risk of flooding should not be increased or created where no risk previously existed. Within this context development proposals will not be acceptable unless they incorporate safeguards to prevent noise, light, air or water pollution and do not contribute directly or indirectly to problems of flooding. A risk-based approach will be applied when determining applications in relation to flooding issues which will give preference to the development of sites that are at a lower risk of flooding in accordance with the sequential test of PPG25. More detailed coverage of issues relevant to the Environment Agency is contained in paragraphs 13.3.16 to 13.3.29 of the Community Services section and POLICIES CS-4, CS-5, CS-6, CS-7, CS-8 (paras. 13.3.19 to 13.3.29) relate to floodplains, flood defences, the protection of groundwater, surface water drainage, watercourses and the coast.

5.3.11 POLICY GD-4:

PROPOSALS FOR DEVELOPMENT WILL NOT BE PERMITTED WHERE THEY WOULD CAUSE SIGNIFICANT HARM AS A RESULT OF INADEQUATE PROVISION FOR:

(i) SEWERAGE, SEWAGE TREATMENT, SURFACE WATER DRAINAGE AND WATER SUPPLY;

(ii) THE PREVENTION OF NOISE, LIGHT, AIR OR WATER POLLUTION; OR

(iii) THE PREVENTION OF FLOODING, ON SITE OR ELSEWHERE.

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Highway Issues

5.3.12 The provision of safe site access and ensuring the adequacy of the approach roads to accommodate likely levels and types of traffic including emergency vehicles are important factors in assessing the acceptability of development proposals. The Fire Brigade issue guidance notes on the provision of general access for appliances and in formulating proposals applicants should take account of local highway authority guidelines and Department for Transport technical memoranda. It is often the case that new developments and conversions of existing buildings involve associated access alterations, such as visibility splays, which have a greater impact than the development itself. The impact of such road and access improvements must be minimised and the assessment of highway alterations, including the cumulative effect of similar proposals in the same area, must form an integral part of the initial appraisal of a scheme. POLICY TP-8 (para. 12.3.43) also seeks to minimise and mitigate the impact of road improvement schemes which are justified on highway safety grounds.

5.3.13 POLICY GD-5:

PROPOSALS FOR DEVELOPMENT WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED WHERE THE SAFE MOVEMENT OF TRAFFIC CAN BE ACCOMMODATED WITHOUT THE NEED FOR ALTERATION TO THE PROPOSED ACCESS OR THE ROADS LEADING TO THE SITE THAT WOULD HAVE A SIGNIFICANT ADVERSE EFFECT ON THE CHARACTER AND AMENITY OF THE SURROUNDING AREA.

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Advertisements and Signs

5.3.14 The function and purpose of advertisements and signs vary considerably. Most commonly signs are required to advertise the whereabouts of a business and to draw attention to the type of service and goods available. Such signs are usually displayed on the premises or land to which they relate but advance advertisements are also a frequent feature particularly where a business is operating in a low profile urban location or in the countryside. PPG 19 "Outdoor Advertisement Control" identifies that the display of advertisements can only be controlled on the grounds of amenity and public safety. The display of advertisements and signs is subject to complicated and detailed regulations and a significant part of the District is designated as an Area of Special Control where more strict rules apply to siting and size. Sensitively designed, well located advertisements can achieve their primary aim while adding to the attractiveness and interest of the street scene. However, excessively large or garish signs or a proliferation of such signs can have a seriously detrimental impact on the amenity of both urban areas and the countryside and, at worst, constitute visual pollution. It is essential that advertisements and signs are in keeping with their surroundings and, where displayed on a building, they respect its character. Where illumination is proposed it must be executed in such a way as to avoid light pollution or adverse effects on the area in which the sign is located or the amenity of dwellings.

5.3.15 It is clearly important for businesses in rural areas to advertise their presence and, where necessary, give potential customers directional guidance. However, poorly designed signs or an excess of advertisements can be confusing and introduce discordant elements to the rural scene. Where signs are required, which are not intended to direct persons to a site, they must be located in close proximity to the buildings or land to which they relate and be of a design which is in keeping with the locality. The cumulative effect of signs, many of which may be acceptable singly or in limited numbers, can seriously affect the visual amenity of a locality. One way that a reduction in the number of signs can be achieved in both towns and villages and the open countryside, is through the grouping of advertisements and joint signing initiatives. This approach would also be of benefit in relation to highway signage, which is not subject to planning control, but often contributes significantly to clutter in both urban and rural areas. As indicated earlier advance signs also have implications for public safety. Standard conditions are used to require advertisements to be kept safe, reasonably clean and tidy and to ensure that there is no conflict with road traffic or other similar signs. POLICY GD-6 identifies the approach to be applied throughout the District but it should be noted that the additional requirements of POLICY TV-8 (para. 7.3.23) will also need to be taken into account in Conservation Areas.

5.3.16 POLICY GD-6:

ADVERTISEMENTS AND SIGNS MUST BE IN KEEPING WITH THE CHARACTER AND APPEARANCE OF THE SURROUNDING AREA. PROPOSALS WILL BE PERMITTED PROVIDED THAT:

(i) THE NUMBER, SIZE, DESIGN AND COLOUR OF THOSE DISPLAYED ON OR CLOSE TO A BUILDING RESPECT ITS SCALE, DESIGN, FEATURES AND SETTING;

(ii) THE INTENSITY AND FORM OF ILLUMINATION WOULD NOT RESULT IN LIGHT POLLUTION OR HAVE AN ADVERSE IMPACT ON THE AREA OR AMENITY OF DWELLINGS; AND

(iii) ADVERTISEMENTS AND SIGNS IN THE OPEN COUNTRYSIDE, WHICH ARE NOT DIRECTIONAL, ARE LOCATED IN CLOSE PROXIMITY TO THE PREMISES TO WHICH THEY RELATE AND ARE OF A SIZE AND DESIGN, AND USE MATERIALS AND COLOURS, THAT ARE APPROPRIATE TO THE LOCALITY.

JOINT SIGNING PROPOSALS THAT EFFECTIVELY REDUCE THE OVERALL NUMBER, SIZE AND CUMULATIVE EFFECT OF ADVERTISEMENTS WILL BE ACCEPTABLE. A PROLIFERATION OF ADVANCE SIGNS WILL NOT BE PERMITTED.

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Conversion of Non-Residential Buildings

5.3.17 Policy ENV 11 of the Structure Plan (Policy 2, 2004) identifies that provision should be made for the re-use, adaptation and conversion of existing buildings subject to certain safeguards. In rural areas the policy places a priority on making provision for employment needs. Where the conversion of an existing non-residential building to another use is proposed there are several general issues to be considered in relation to the way in which the conversion is carried out. Buildings proposed for conversion will be of widely varying types ranging from traditional stone buildings to more modern structures and previous uses will also vary considerably resulting in different physical characteristics in terms of size, form, detailing and materials. It is essential that, in the best examples, such characteristics are retained and respected and where the policies of the Plan permit the conversion of a building of less distinctive merit (para. 5.13.19) the proposal must result in an overall improvement in its character.

5.3.18 Outside towns and villages, where the circumstances in which new buildings will be allowed are strictly limited, it is equally important to limit the impact of conversions. A sympathetically designed and well executed conversion of a building which is capable of accommodating its new use should have a minimal impact on its surroundings. In trying to ensure that any impact is kept to the minimum it is essential that conversions do not involve major extensions or rebuilding. While in many cases an actual conversion can be carried out without adverse impact on its location, ancillary operations and activities can have an effect, often over wide areas. For example the visual impact of parking or the establishment of a compound or yard associated with a business use can introduce an alien element or uncharacteristic division of land within or around a traditional farm complex. The visual impact can be further limited by locating associated facilities such as storage, garaging and plant in existing buildings rather than new structures. It is essential that, in the countryside, the initial assessment of the suitability of premises for conversion takes into account fully all the factors associated with the proposed use and the ability of the building or buildings to accommodate the use without causing intrusion in the landscape. In addition the provision of services must not have an adverse environmental impact, for example, electricity to isolated buildings by way of overhead lines. Where it is considered that the subsequent exercising of permitted development rights would be likely to cause harm to the character, setting, surroundings or architectural value of a building a condition will be imposed withdrawing such rights.

5.3.19 In considering proposals for the conversion of non-residential buildings they must first meet the requirements of the appropriate policy relating to residential, employment or tourism use. (POLICIES H-11, E-4, TM-12 or TM-13). When a proposal is considered acceptable in the context of these policies POLICY GD-7 becomes applicable in setting out the general principles relevant to the way in which the conversion is undertaken in the interests of safeguarding the character of the building and its surroundings. In addition the provisions of POLICY GD-2 will be relevant and, where a proposal lies within or close to a Conservation Area, the relevant policies in the Towns and Villages will also apply. A leaflet containing advice on the conversion of barns, particularly their external appearance, is available from the Planning and Building Control Service.

5.3.20 POLICY GD-7:

PROPOSALS FOR THE CONVERSION OF NON-RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS TO OTHER USES SHOULD RETAIN AND RESPECT THE FORM OF THE BUILDING IN TERMS OF ITS CONTRIBUTION TO THE CHARACTER OF ITS SURROUNDINGS. WHERE THE BUILDING TO BE CONVERTED IS OUTSIDE A TOWN OR THE VILLAGES LISTED IN POLICIES H-5 AND H-6 PROPOSALS WILL NOT BE PERMITTED WHERE THEY WOULD CAUSE SIGNIFICANT HARM TO THE CHARACTER OF THE COUNTRYSIDE AND THE FOLLOWING REQUIREMENTS SHOULD THEREFORE BE MET:

(i) THE BUILDING MUST BE CAPABLE OF CONVERSION WITHOUT THE NEED FOR MAJOR EXTENSION OR REBUILDING;

(ii) THE EFFECT OF THE CONVERSION, INCLUDING THE CHANGE OF USE OF ITS CURTILAGE OR SITE, MUST NOT HAVE A DETRIMENTAL IMPACT ON THE DISTINCTIVENESS OF THE LANDSCAPE OR RURAL CHARACTER OF THE BUILDING;

(iii) ANCILLARY FACILITIES INCLUDING GARAGES AND STORAGE SPACE SHOULD BE ACCOMMODATED IN EXISTING BUILDINGS; AND

(iv) THE PROVISION OF SERVICES SHOULD NOT HAVE AN ADVERSE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT.
PERMITTED DEVELOPMENT RIGHTS WILL BE WITHDRAWN BY CONDITION FOR DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD BE LIKELY TO SIGNIFICANTLY ADVERSELY AFFECT THE CHARACTER OF THE BUILDING, ITS SETTING OR SURROUNDINGS.

Note: In order to assess fully the effect of a proposed conversion details and a structural survey will be required at an early stage. Outline applications will not be acceptable.

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Buildings of Local Significance

5.3.21 Throughout the District there are many buildings that are of particular local importance to the community but which are not listed as being of national historical or architectural interest. Buildings such as chapels, schools, institutes, halls and public houses all form part of the social fabric and history of a community not just because of the functions they fulfil but also through their contribution to the local scene. In many cases, for example schools, a large number of people in the community have strong ties with the buildings through having spent a significant part of their lives closely associated with them. The conversion of such buildings to other uses is often a practical way of achieving their retention. However, it is important that special architectural features or elements of the building which have particular historic relevance are not lost as a result of conversion and that the relationship of the building to its setting and the effect of the conversion and proposed use on its surroundings are taken into account. Proposals for the conversion of buildings under POLICY GD-8 must also comply with the requirements of POLICIES GD-7 (para. 5.3.20) H-11 (para. 8.3.66) E-4 (para. 9.3.25) TM-12 and TM-13 (paras. 10.3.50 and 10.3.54).

5.3.22 POLICY GD-8:

PROPOSALS FOR THE CONVERSION OF BUILDINGS WHICH ARE OF LOCAL SOCIAL, ARCHITECTURAL OR HISTORIC SIGNIFICANCE IN TERMS OF A PREVIOUS OR CURRENT USE OR A LOCALLY DISTINCTIVE STYLE OF BUILDING SHOULD RETAIN RELEVANT HISTORIC AND ARCHITECTURAL FEATURES.

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Summary of POLICIES and PROPOSALS

TOPIC LOCAL PLAN POLICIES/PROPOSALS STRUCTURE PLAN POLICIES 1997 (2004)
Scale and siting of development GD-1 ENV 12 (Policies 2 & 16)
Design and layout of development GD-2 (CC-9, CC-10, CC-12, TV-7, H-18) ENV 12, TRAN 5 (Policies 1, 2, 3, 7 & 28)
Landscaping and planting GD-3 ENV 12 (Policy 2)
Services/prevention of pollution and flooding GD-4 (CS-1 , CS-4, CS-5, CS-6, CS-7, CS-8) ENV 14, ENV 15, ENV 16, R 1, R 3 (Policies 3 & 15)
Highway issues GD-5 (TP-8) (Policy 27 & 28)
Advertisements and signs GD-6 (TV-8)  
Conversion of non-residential buildings GD-7 (GD-8, H-11, E-4, TM-12, TM-13) ENV 11 (Policy 2)
Buildings of local significance GD-8 (GD-7, H-11, E-4, TM-12, TM-13) ENV 11 (Policy 2)
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