Coverack flash floods updates

Cornwall Council is working in Coverack as part of a multi-agency partnership set up to respond to the devastating flash flooding that hit the village on 18 July.

A major incident was declared in Coverack at 5.40pm on 18 July and our emergency and community services responded immediately to rescue and support local residents affected by the extreme weather and flash floods.

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You can read more about the work taking place in Coverack in our updates below.

On Tuesday 18 July in the afternoon we saw localised flash flooding impacting people of Coverack. The impact of this is devastating and is clear to everyone in the village.

This was an extreme, isolated event, but one of devastation. For the people in Coverack this was a shocking event which not only impacted them at the time but will remain with them whilst they rebuild their homes, businesses and community.

We are doing all that we can to work with the community to help return Coverack to normal as quickly as possible.

Agencies who have been working with Cornwall Council to provide assistance to the Coverack community include CORMAC, Cornwall Fire and Rescue and Community Safety Service, Environment Agency, South West Water, HM Coastguard, Volunteer Cornwall, Public Health Cornwall and Devon and Cornwall Police.

People who wish to make a donation can do so via Cornwall Live’s just giving page www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/CornwallLive

People who wish to offer practical help can call the Council's Coverack helpline: 0800 731 7247.

With the road open, beaches and bathing waters safe to enjoy again, work is still going on in Coverack. Our Localism Community Link Officers, who have been based in Coverack since the flash floods happened on 18 July, are still supporting everyone with on-going issues, but will not be based in the village from today (Friday 28 July).

If you need help after today please phone our Council Contact Centre on 0300 1234 100.

To arrange collection of waste items damaged by the floods please phone 0300 1234 141

For befriending and general wellbeing assistance please phone Volunteer Cornwall on 01872 265305

For advice and possible financial aid visit the Cornwall Community Foundation website www.cornwallfoundation.com

Our Localism team, who have been based in Coverack since 18 July, have moved from the Paris Hotel and will be at St Peter's Hall on Friday 28 July, between 10am and 2pm.

Coverack is now very much open for business, with hotels and holiday accommodation and shops, cafes and restaurants welcoming both local residents and visitors.

At the same time work on the recovery is continuing, with support for disposing of waste items generated by the floods, repairs to minor roads and sections of the coastal footpath damaged by the flood water, and advice, information and guidance available.

Council staff are continuing to work with Volunteer Cornwall and will be available to meet local residents in the Paris Hotel between 10am and 2pm over the next few days.  The emergency helpline set up by the Council immediately following the floods will be live until the end of this week for anyone who has not been able to speak face to face with a member of staff.  After this members of the public with queries can contact staff in the Council’s contact centre on 0300 1234 100.

The skips provided by the Council will remain in place on Mill Road today (Tuesday) for people to dispose of the waste items.  After this householders will be able to contact the Council’s waste team on 0300 1234 141 to arrange collection of furniture, white goods etc damaged by the floods for the rest of the week.

Following confirmation that the potential pollution problems caused by the flood damage have been resolved, the warning signs have been removed and people are being encouraged to enjoy Coverack’s beautiful beaches and bathing waters.

Local Member Julian Rand has been humbled by the way everyone has worked together to support the people and businesses affected by the floods.

We know that there is still more to do andwe want to reassure the local community that we are not leaving just because the road has re opened today; we will remain in the village until the repairs had been completed.

Coverack is very much open for business and we will be working with the Local Enterprise Partnership and other partners to promote this message loud and clear.

Work is continuing today to repair the main road into Coverack and support the local residents and businesses which were affected by the devastating flash floods which swept through the village on Tuesday evening.

Local Cornwall Councillor Julian Rand has been supporting the local community throughout the devastating event and has praised the way everyone has pulled together.

"The response to this extremely damaging event by the local inhabitants has been amazing - brave, resilient, working to help one another and doing so with a smile” he said. “Cornwall Council’s response has been fast and very effective and, together with the hard work of the Cormac teams, shows how much a well co-ordinated approach can achieve. All the residents I have spoken to have been extremely appreciative of the work which has been carried out to date.

Council staff will be at the Paris Hotel to provide advice and support to residents between 10am and 4pm today (23 July), tomorrow, and early next week and will ensure an ongoing commitment to the community.

Skips are available for rubbish and arrangements are now in place for people needing to dispose of larger household items such as sofas and carpets.

Packing boxes are available for anyone needing to move household or business items to be able to make repairs to their property.

An Age UK Cornwall shuttle bus will be operating from Monday 24 July until Friday 28 July, from the local Community Primary School field to the centre of the village, between 9am and 4.30pm.

For further information on the road reconstruction see CORMAC’s Coverack page which will be updated daily.

With recovery efforts still in full swing, the main road into Coverack is expected to open next week.

Around 40 CORMAC staff had been working on repairing the damage caused by the floods since Tuesday evening. Subject to the weather we expect reconstruction work to be finished over the weekend, with the road resurfaced and open next week.

For further information on the road reconstruction see CORMAC’s Coverack page which will be updated daily.

100 tonnes of debris were cleared from the road through the village on Wednesday to allow access to the nursing home and enable people access to their properties. A further 250 tonnes of material was removed yesterday.  

CORMAC teams have also been checking and clearing highways drains and culverts, as well as re grading private lanes to ensure that residents can access their properties.  

Council Leader Adam Paynter and Cabinet Member for Transport Geoff Brown attended the residents meeting held in the Paris Hotel this morning and acknowledged the efforts of all involved, saying “It has been truly impressive the way agencies, volunteers and the local community have pulled together. There have been some remarkable examples of individuals and organisations going over and above to help others, from the owners of the Paris Hotel and other local businesses donating goods and equipment to the many volunteer organisations who have pitched in to help."

All the partners are working as a team to support the village and we will continue until all the work taking place has been completed.

Local Cornwall Councillor Julian Rand has also been in the village to offer his help and support to those affected by the flooding and has praised the strength of community spirit and the support which has been provided by the agencies and voluntary organisations. 

Council staff will remain at the Paris Hotel to provide advice and support to residents between 10am and 2pm on Saturday 22 July and Sunday 23 July, as well as every day next week.  People can also access assistance via the Council’s helpline 0800 731 3247.

Skips are available for rubbish and arrangements are now in place for people needing to dispose of larger household items such as sofas and carpets. 

The Cornwall Community Foundation can provide financial assistance to affected residents needing immediate help. Details on how to access this can be obtained from our Coverack webpage, the Community Link Officers who are based at the Paris Hotel, or from the Cornwall Council helpline - 0800 731 3247.

Work has progressed on providing temporary parking on the outskirts of the village, and an Age UK Cornwall shuttle bus will be operating next week, from Monday 24 July, between the local Community Primary School field to the centre of the village between 9am and 4.30pm every day until the road is re-opened. We are very grateful to the school for letting us use their field and Age UK for responding so quickly.

Potential pollution from a broken sewer line remains a health concern.  While there are no reported issues with mains supply drinking water, the breach of the main sewage line means the local streams and beach may be contaminated.  Precautionary warning signs have been placed near the beach and two local streams while works are carried out to repair the breach. 

People are advised not to go near the water and if they come in contact with the water to make sure they wash their hands and follow good hygiene practices. Precautions should also be taken with regards to pets and livestock. Anyone who gets their drinking water from a private water supply such as a borehole, spring or well which has potentially been covered by floodwater is advised to look out for a change in water quality, such as the water becoming discoloured or there is a change in taste or smell, should assume the water is unsafe to drink unless boiled and should continue to use boiled water for drinking and bathing until the supply has been tested and shown to be safe. People with private drainage such as septic tank or cess pits are also being advised to have them checked to ensure that they are still operating correctly after the floods.

The floods have also caused damage to parts of the South West Coast Path and the section of coast path at Rosenithon, near St Keverne, is currently closed. A diversion is in place round the back of Dean Quarry. The rest of the South West Coast Path Lowland Point (to the South of Dean Quarry) to Coverack has suffered some damage but is still open. A section of the coast path from Coverack to Cadgwith is closed as you leave Cadgwith village heading south. A diversion is in place to Chynalls Cliff. Surveying of the South West Coast Path and the surrounding Public Rights of Way is ongoing. In the meantime, we ask that the public to take care and be vigilant of any damage caused by the storm. If you identify any damage, you can report this by ringing 0300 1234 202.

Given today’s weather forecast we are aware that many people will be anxious about the impact of further rain. We can reassure you that all the highways drains were checked and cleared yesterday by the highways teams, with the culverts checked by Environment Agency staff.

We have also had a number of sandbags delivered to the village – if you would like to have some, please speak to one of the Community Link Officers from the Council's Localism Team.

Work continued today by Cornwall Council and partner agencies to repair the damage caused by a flash flood through the village of Coverack earlier this week.

Today drains and culverts throughout Coverack and surrounding areas were cleared of debris deposited by the flash floods. All the highways drains in the village have been checked and cleared with staff from the Environment Agency checking all the culverts.

Work continued on repairing the B3294, with heavy plant machinery arriving earlier today to remove the surface of the road so that detailed investigations can be carried out into the damage to the underneath of the carriageway.

The damage caused to the roads by the flash floods means that more than 150 tonnes of rubble has to be removed. Teams from CORMAC have cleared a path through the rubble for construction vehicles to access the site, and will be removing the remainder of the debris over the next few days. The road will remain closed until the repairs have been completed. Work on repairing the road is progressing well and we are hopeful that it will be completed quicker than we originally estimated.

The floods have also caused damage to parts of the coast path. The section of coast path at Rosenithon is currently closed, with a diversion in place round the back of Dean Quarry. The rest of the coast path to Coverack from Lowland Point has suffered some damage but is still open. The coast path between Coverack and St Keverne is also closed, as is the section at Sunny Corner.

Councillor Geoff Brown, the Council’s Cabinet Member for Transport, visited the village this morning and praised the work of the agencies and the local community in supporting the recovery operations.

Work is also continuing to support the owners of the 50 properties which were affected by flooding, with skips being provided in the centre of the village. Arrangements are also being put in place to dispose of larger household items, such as sofas and carpets, with anyone needing assistance asked to call the Cornwall Council emergency line on 0800 731 3247.

Up to five houses in the village are currently believed to be uninhabitable and staff from the Council’s Localism team are working with partners to find temporary accommodation for people who cannot immediately return home.

Community Link Officers from Cornwall Council have been on hand at the Paris Hotel in Coverack to provide help throughout today, and will also be at the hotel tomorrow, and during next week to provide advice and support. They have seen more than 100 people so far, with a wide range of queries and concerns from finding temporary accommodation and disposing of waste, to concerns over accessing their properties because of damage to minor roads and lanes.

Members of the Localism team will be based at the Paris hotel between 10 am and 4pm tomorrow (Friday 21 July), and will also be at the hotel every day next week to provide advice and support.

Representatives from all the key agencies involved in the clean up will be attending the second residents’ meeting which is being held at the Paris Hotel at 11 am tomorrow morning (Friday 21 July) to provide an update on the progress which is being made, and answer any questions. The meeting, which will be hosted by Council Leader Adam Paynter, will also include information on the support which is available for businesses which have been affected by the floods, including council tax relief, and advice from the British Association of Insurers.

The Council is continuing to work with Volunteer Cornwall who will coordinate offers of assistance from members of the community to provide support. Offers of assistance can be reported via 0800 731 3247.

The Cornwall Community Foundation has also confirmed that financial assistance can be provided to affected residents needing immediate help. Details on how to access this can be obtained from the Community Link Officers or from the Cornwall Council emergency line - 0800 7313247.

We are working with the local landowners to identify locations to provide temporary parking.

The potential pollution from a broken sewer line remains a health concern. South West Water has carried out an initial assessment and confirms that there are no reported issues with mains supply drinking water however, the main sewage line has been breached which means the local streams and beach may be contaminated. Precautionary warning signs have been placed near the beach and two local streams while works are carried out to repair the breach.

People are advised not to go near the water and if they come in contact with the water to make sure they wash their hands and follow good hygiene practices. Precautions should also be taken with regards to pets and livestock.

Anyone who gets their drinking water from a private water supply such as a borehole, spring or well which has potentially been covered by floodwater is advised to look out for a change in water quality, such as the water becoming discoloured or there is a change in taste or smell, should assume the water is unsafe to drink unless boiled and should continue to use boiled water for drinking and bathing until the supply has been tested and shown to be safe.

People with private drainage such as septic tank or cess pits are also being advised to have them checked to ensure that they are still operating correctly after the floods.

Cornwall Council and partner agencies are continuing to work with affected residents in Coverack to support recovery operations; we are working to help rebuild the Coverack community as quickly as possible.

Temporary accommodation is currently being sought for three people who have been displaced and cannot immediately return home.

So residents can access support quickly, Community Link Officers from Cornwall Council will be on hand at the Paris Hotel in Coverack to provide help today and tomorrow between 10am and 4pm. The Link Officer will coordinate help from multiple agencies where needed, providing a single point of contact.

Residents can also call the Cornwall Council emergency line on: 0800 7313247 with any questions, queries and concerns.

A second meeting will also be held to update residents and respond to any questions. This meeting will be held at the Paris Hotel at 11am on Friday 21 July, The meeting will be hosted by Council Leader Adam Paynter.

The Cornwall community has been quick to respond to the flash flooding with offers of assistance. The Council is working with Volunteer Cornwall who will coordinate offers of assistance from members of the community to provide support. Offers of assistance can be reported via 0800 7313247 .

The Cornwall Community Foundation has also confirmed that financial assistance can be provided to affected residents needing immediate help. Details on how to access this is on our website www.cornwall.gov.uk/coverack or can be obtained from the Community Link Officers or from the Cornwall Council emergency line: 0800 731 3247.

Following safety checks by utility companies and an assessment yesterday, work to repair the main road in to the village began this morning.

We are working with the local landowners to identify locations to provide temporary parking for residents.

Initial removal of domestic waste was completed yesterday where access was available. Plans are being drawn up to help residents and businesses dispose of household goods and debris. Two lockable skips are already on route to the village this morning, with further skips being organised to deal with different types of waste.

Pollution from a broken sewer line remains a health concern. South West Water has carried out an initial assessment and confirm that there are no reported issues with mains supply drinking water however, the main sewage line has been breached which means the local streams and beach may be contaminated. Precautionary warning signs have been placed near the beach and two local streams.

People are advised not to go near the water and if they come in contact with the water to make sure they wash their hands and follow good hygiene practices. Precautions should also be taken with regards to pets and livestock.

Anyone who gets their water from a private water supply such as a borehole, spring or well which has potentially been covered by floodwater is advised to look out for a change in water quality, such as the water becoming discoloured or there is a change in taste or smell, should assume the water is unsafe to drink unless boiled and should continue to use boiled water for drinking and bathing until the supply has been tested and shown to be safe.

We are now focussing on the recovery phase - our initial focus is to develop a short term plan to help get Coverack’s residents back on their feet. We have been clearing debris from the road and village and we will start work on repairing the road tomorrow morning.

About 150 people attended the residents’ meeting at 11.30am along with Adam Paynter Cornwall Council Leader, Geoff Brown Cornwall Council Cabinet Member for Transport, Cormac, the Environment Agency and Devon and Cornwall Constabulary.

Adam, Geoff and the others were there to listen to the community and paid tribute to the fantastic community response from both residents and visitors.
Residents’ biggest concerns are around: parking, the road, pollution of streams and beach, removal of waste and debris, and blocked ditches and culverts. There are also some concerns about the Coast Path.

We have reassured residents that although there are a lot of agencies involved, we are working as one team to get village back to normal as soon as possible.

We are investigating the possibility of setting up a temporary car park.
Access to the village is a priority; Cormac will be bringing in a planing machine tomorrow morning. It is difficult to know how long the work might take as it will depend on what they find when they assess the damage. Cormac will be staying in Coverack until the work on the road is done.

We have been working to clear access to a care home, a digger is on site to help with that and a generator has been brought in to help with power issues.

Two Environment Agency crews are on site to clear debris on beach and bridges.

Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service are still on site and Devon and Cornwall Police are supporting all the other agencies.

Last night our focus was on making sure people were safe. As well as the two people rescued by the helicopter, three people were rescued by fire crews assisted by the Coastguard. There were no casualties reported. Two people evacuated by helicopter have been confirmed as safe - one is in a care home, one is with relatives, and a third person has returned home. Fire and other emergency services crews remained in the village overnight. We set up an emergency shelter for people to get advice and guidance if needed and ensured communication with residents’ via media and door-knocking.

A residents meeting was set up so people could get help, ask questions and help shape the recovery of the community.

We have drawn up plans to support the village to recover from the incident.

Today our focus is on the recovery phase and how we support local residents and businesses how to get back on their feet.

Work is continuing on assessing the damage caused to properties and the road caused by the flash floods which affected Coverack this evening. 

Our priority today is to assess the immediate risks – this includes road access, public health, waste removal and resident and tourist wellbeing.

Emergency and Council staff are working together in the village today to start to answer questions and understand what’s needed. 

We will be collecting information from residents and holiday makers to assess their needs and provide ongoing support.

Roads

Coverack has two roads in and out. The main road is currently impassable with the secondary road, School Lane a single track and narrow; Traffic management has been put in place to ensure traffic flow.

150 tonnes of debris is on the main road making it impassable.

So we can focus on providing residents with immediate help and assistance, we are urging people who don’t need to be in the area to stay away.

If you need to travel into Coverack, we are working on a local traffic plan which will include temporary parking.

Western Power and BT are on site and assessing any damage to utilities

South West Water has confirmed the mains water supply is OK.

The sewer is breached in two places and South West Water are on site assessing this.

The road will need a complete reconstruction. Once the utilities confirm access is safe we will review options. We would be looking to make the road passable and restore access within days.

We are looking at interim local parking arrangements for residents.

Electricity

We are working with utilities provider to confirm supplies and conducting further assessments to address any specific needs.

Water

At this point in time there are no reported issues with mains drinking water.

Environment agency have deployed teams to look at the impact on waterways and any risks following reports of detritus and waste from domestic oil tanks in waterways.

South West Water have done an initial assessment and are on site and will do further detailed assessments today. 

The main sewage line has been breached which means the local streams and beach may be contaminated. Precautionary warning signs will be placed near the beach and two local streams today. 

People are advised not to go near the water and if they come in contact with the water to make sure they wash their hands. Precautions should also be taken with regards to pets and livestock.

Private water supplies

Water supplies can be domestic and commercial. Private supplies are either from boreholes, springs, or wells. The microbiological and chemical quality of water can be influenced by surface waters, and contamination can follow heavy rainfall. Normally boreholes have a secure wellhead thereby minimising the risk of surface water incursion into the groundwater. Local Authority Environmental Health Department are responsible for overseeing the quality of private supplies and are provided with technical advice by the DWI.

During heavy rain and flooding there are risks of animal and human waste contaminating private supplies.

If a private well or spring has been covered by floodwater, or if you notice a change in water quality, such as the water becoming discoloured or there is a change in taste or smell, or if you are unsure, ring your local authority. Whilst waiting for an answer, assume the water is unsafe to drink unless boiled, or source an alternative supply. 

Continue to use boiled water for drinking and bathing until the supply has been tested and shown to be safe. Boiling water kills pathogenic bacteria, viruses and parasites that may be present in water. Bring the water to the boil and then allow it to cool before drinking. It can be stored in a clean jug covered by a saucer in a cool place (preferably a working fridge). Ice should be made from water prepared for drinking.

Waste

A refuse collection was due today; due to access issues, we’ve arranged some special collections - caged pickups will be sent in today to collect household waste and we will look to undertake street cleaning of basic litter.

We’re still assessing removal of the bulkier debris and will let you know about removal of bulky goods which have been damaged and need removal. This may include the provision of skips.

Insurance

We are working with the British Association of Insurance as we need to evaluate what we can remove without impacting insurance assessments and claims.

Information

We have a range of information for people on issues such as recovering from floods, cleaning up your home, mental health and more. We will have hard copies of this information available in Coverack through the Community Link Officers this afternoon.

This information will also be available on the Cornwall Council website, Facebook @forCornwall and Twitter @CornwallCouncil

Vulnerable people

We are liaising with district nurses and domiciliary care to identify any individuals at risk and can provide them with any help needed.

Help and assistance

  • Cornwall Council Emergency contact line: 0800 731 3247

  • Cornwall Council’s Localism Service Community Link Officers are present in the town and will be here until the end of the day for people with any concerns or issues. 

  • We are also setting up a web page on the Cornwall Council website www.cornwall.gov.uk/coverack where people will be able to find updates and links to information on how to clean their homes, recovering from a flood and more.

Holiday home owners

People who have holiday homes in the area can contact the Emergency Line for information.

Donations and help

People of Cornwall and beyond are rallying around with offers of help; people wanting to help can make a donation via the Cornwall Live’s just giving page www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/CornwallLive

The waters have now subsided considerably and there is no suggestion of further heavy rainfall in the area this evening.

The Emergency Centre is being closed overnight, however two fire crews will remain in Coverack overnight and other Council staff are on standby to react if needed. Members of the Council’s Localism team will be in the village from early tomorrow morning to provide support and guidance.

There will be a meeting of the multi-agency Recovery Group in County Hall, Truro at 9am to co-ordinate the recovery phase.

The public liaison meeting will be held at 11.30am tomorrow morning in the Paris Hotel, Coverack.

Work is continuing on assessing the damage caused to properties and the road caused by the flash floods which affected Coverack this evening.

As well as the two people rescued by the helicopter, three people were rescued by fire crews assisted by the Coastguard. There were no casualties reported.

Fire and other emergency services crews are expected to remain in the village until the early hours of the morning.

Plans are being drawn up to support the village to recover from the incident. A public meeting is being held in the Paris Hotel tomorrow morning which will be led by officers from Cornwall Council, who will be able to assist those affected by this incident and to provide advice and guidance.

Cornwall’s multi-agency emergency centre remains open in County Hall, Truro to co-ordinate the response to the flash flooding in Coverack.

The first calls about flooding affecting the village were received at 3.40pm. The situation then escalated, with further reports of one person being trapped in an outbuilding and six people trapped on the roof of their property.

Following a large number of additional calls to flooded properties, a major incident was declared at 5.20pm, and a helicopter was scrambled to rescue the people trapped on the roof.

About 50 properties are estimated to be affected by the flooding, but no injuries have been reported. There are 15 appliances currently at the scene, with four officers from Cornwall Fire and rescue and Community Safety Service,
Emergency crews have rescued a number of people from their properties, and this work is continuing.

The road into Coverack has been affected by the flooding and is currently impassable.

Chief Inspector Mark Bolt, who is leading the multi-agency team at the emergency centre, said “This will have been a very distressing incident for all those involved and our thoughts are with everyone who has been affected. We would like to thank the crews from Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service, the Search and Rescue helicopter and HM Coastguard Service for their efforts.”

With the latest information from the MET office suggesting there is a risk of further heavy rain, the public are asked to drive carefully and not to drive though flood water.

The latest reports from Coverack show that the water is receding.

The Incident Commander from Cornwall Fire and Rescue and Community Safety Service is reporting that good progress is being made in dealing with the situation.

A number of properties in the village and one of the roads into Coverack have suffered structural damage and are due to be inspected by structural engineers. Highways engineers from CORMAC are also assessing the damage to the road.

A local hotel has made accommodation available for anyone who is unable to return to their home this evening. One elderly resident has been relocated to a local nursing home.

Representatives from Cornwall Council’s Localism team will be in the village to co-ordinate local support and provide information to local residents. 15 Fire and Rescue appliances are still in the village.

Cornwall’s multi agency emergency centre has been opened in County Hall, Truro to co-ordinate the response to the flash flooding in Coverack.

The first calls about flooding affecting the village were received at 3.40pm. The situation then escalated, with further reports of one person being trapped in an outbuilding and six people trapped on the roof of their property.

Following a large number of additional calls to flooded properties, a major incident was declared at 5.20pm, and a helicopter was scrambled to rescue the people trapped on the roof.

About 50 properties are estimated to be affected by the flooding, but no injuries have been reported. There are 15 appliances currently at the scene, with four officers from Cornwall Fire and rescue and Community Safety Service, emergency crews have rescued a number of people from their properties, and this work is continuing.

The road into Coverack has been affected by the flooding and is currently impassable.

Chief Inspector Mark Bolt, who is leading the multi-agency team at the emergency centre, said “This will have been a very distressing incident for all those involved and our thoughts are with everyone who has been affected; we would like to thank the crews from Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service, the Search and Rescue helicopter and HM Coastguard Service for their efforts.”
With the latest information from the MET office suggesting there is a risk of further heavy rain, the public are asked to drive carefully and not to drive though flood water.

Further updates will be provided as the situation changes.

Cornwall Council announces road into Coverack expected to open next week
With recovery efforts still in full swing, the main road into Coverack is expected to open next week after devastating floods hit the small community, significantly ahead of the original projected timescales.  The news was shared with residents at a meeting hosted by Cornwall Council and held at the Paris Hotel in Coverack this morning.
Councillor Geoff Brown, the Cabinet Member for Transport, told the meeting around 40 CORMAC staff had been working on repairing the damage caused by the floods since Tuesday evening. “It’s fantastic news that we expect to re-open the road into the village early next week.  Subject to the weather we expect reconstruction work to be finished over the weekend, with the road resurfaced and open next week.  “
100 tonnes of debris were cleared from the road through the village on Wednesday to allow access to the nursing home and enable people access to their properties. A further 250 tonnes of material was removed yesterday.  
CORMAC teams have also been checking and clearing highways drains and culverts, as well as re grading private lanes to ensure that residents can access their properties.  
Council Leader Adam Paynter also attended the residents meeting and acknowledged the efforts of all involved. “It has been truly impressive the way agencies, volunteers and the local community have pulled together. There have been some remarkable examples of individuals and organisations going over and above to help others, from local businesses donating goods and equipment to the many volunteer organisations who have pitched in to help. 
“It’s fantastic news that the road is due to be re-opened earlier than expected and a real testament to CORMAC for their hard work and commitment.  I am sure that no-one who saw the level of damage caused to the road would have thought that it could re open to traffic in a week.  
“While a tremendous amount has been achieved over the past four days, there is still more to do - all the partners are working as a team to support the village and we will continue until all this work has been completed.
“I would specifically like to acknowledge the owners of the Paris Hotel who have generously allowed Council staff to use their premises as a base to meet with local residents”.
Local Cornwall Councillor Julian Rand has also been in the village to offer his help and support to those affected by the flooding and has praised the strength of community spirit and the support which has been provided by the agencies and voluntary organisations. 
Council staff will remain at the Paris Hotel to provide advice and support to residents between 10 am and 2pm on Saturday and Sunday, as well as every day next week.  People can also access assistance via the Council’s helpline 0800 7313247.
Skips are available for rubbish and arrangements are now in place for people needing to dispose of larger household items such as sofas and carpets. 
People wishing to volunteer can also contact the Council’s helpline on 0800 7313247. Council is working with Volunteer Cornwall to coordinate where help is most needed.
The Cornwall Community Foundation can provide financial assistance to affected residents needing immediate help. Details on how to access this can be obtained from the Community Link Officers or from the Cornwall Council helpline - 0800 7313247.
Work has progressed on providing temporary parking on the outskirts of the village, and an Age UK Cornwall shuttle bus will be operating next week, from Monday 24 July, between the local Community Primary School field to the centre of the village between 9am and 4.30pm every day until the road is re-opened. We are very grateful to the school for letting us use their field and Age UK for responding so quickly.
Potential pollution from a broken sewer line remains a health concern.  While there are no reported issues with mains supply drinking water, the breach of the main sewage line means the local streams and beach may be contaminated.  Precautionary warning signs have been placed near the beach and two local streams while works are carried out to repair the breach.  
People are advised not to go near the water and if they come in contact with the water to make sure they wash their hands and follow good hygiene practices. Precautions should also be taken with regards to pets and livestock. 
Anyone who gets their drinking water from a private water supply such as a borehole, spring or well which has potentially been covered by floodwater is advised to look out for a change in water quality, such as the water becoming discoloured or there is a change in taste or smell, should assume the water is unsafe to drink unless boiled and should continue to use boiled water for drinking and bathing until the supply has been tested and shown to be safe.   
People with private drainage such as septic tank or cess pits are also being advised to have them checked to ensure that they are still operating correctly after the floods. 
The Council’s website has useful information on flood recovery www.cornwall.gov.uk/coverack and we will be posting updates specifically about what is happening in Coverack. For further information on the road reconstruction see CORMAC’s Coverack page which will be updated daily.
People who wish to make a donation can do so via Cornwall Live’s just giving page https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/CornwallLive and anyone wanting to offer practical help can call the helpline 0800 731 3247.
Story posted 21 July 2017